Proper regular dental care is important for all horses, regardless of age size or use - just like it is in humans. As well a making for a happier, healthier horse, the benefits provided by proper dental care include being able to maximise the FCR or Feed Conversion Ratio.


From minatures to draft breeds, working stallions require dental examinations and dental care to identify and treat dental disease. Serious dental disease in stallions can present in a range of different ways from no outward sign at all, through to serious weight loss, bad breath and performance issues when ridden. Hard working and performance stallions need to be able comfortably consume enough feed to maintain optimum condition through the breeding season.


Part 2 of the EDV series of articles focusing on Equine Dental Anatomy.

Why is it important to learn about the internal workings of the horse's head? How do equine teeth differ from human teeth? Dr Shannon Lee from Advanced Equine Dentistry explains that a lack of understanding amongst horse owners can have serious welfare consequences.


Why is it important to learn about the internal workings of the horse's head? How do equine teeth differ from human teeth?

Dr Shannon Lee from Advanced Equine Dentistry explains that a lack of understanding amongst horse owners can have serious welfare consequences.


Many people think that equine dentistry is just floating the teeth, and many owners believe that just about anyone can perform equine "dentistry", from the trainer to the farrier. Shannon Lee, BVSc MACVSc, who has been practicing solely equine dentistry since 2006, cringes when he thinks about how little owners think about equine dentistry.


Obesity is becoming a major health concern in horses (and people) all around the world, and is increasingly recognised as an equine welfare issue because it compromises both health and performance, but can you recognise if your horse is too fat or, for that matter, too thin?

In this article, Dr Jennifer Stewart, an equine veterinarian and researcher who specialises in equine nutrition, discusses in detail the importance of keeping horses in a healthy condition, how the body condition scoring system is used to assess the state of each animal, and the steps you can take to successfully control the weight of your horse or pony.


How many times in your life have you suffered from the common cold or flu? Colds and Flu involve infection and inflammation of your sinuses, the hollow areas of the head connected to your nasal cavity.

Snotty noses and all those other symptoms that make you feel miserable, are fairly common in horses. Without a thorough investigation, diagnosis and treatment of the underlying cause, sinus disease can become chronic, and will severely limit the horse's health and performance. 

In this article, leading Equine Dental Veterinarian Dr Shannon Lee explains what sinus disease is, and the treatment options available to horse owners.


Hindsight is a wonderful thing, and buying horses is a risky business.

While there is no such thing as a perfect horse, a pre-purchase exam (PPE) can answer many questions about the likely significance of an abnormality and likely long term prognosis to protect you, the purchaser, from buying a problem that may be expensive, risky or even impossible to fix or treat.

So what does a PPE entail? Dr Olivia James from Brindabella Equine Mobile Veterinary Service explains in this article, and don't miss her video in our TV section.


Sometimes as part of caring for your horse, your vet may recommend sedation or anaesthesia to allow another procedure to be performed safely. 

In this article, Dr Chris Quinn, a lecturer in veterinary anaesthesia at Charles Sturt University will discuss why a horse may need to be sedated or anaesthetised; the methods by which horses can be sedated and anaesthetised; and how vets make this as safe as possible.


Biosecurity is not just about controlling exotic or notifiable diseases, or diseases that are fatal to humans; it’s about general disease control in our horses, right across the board, and it all starts with good hygiene practices and infection control. Dr Shannon Lee discussed biosecurity, what you can do about it, and how important it is to both horse and humans.